Strategies that Work!: Supporting MLLs/ELLs (Part 2)

By Gissel Burgos

A picture of Gissel standing in a school hallway, facing toward the camera, with one arm extended upwards. She is dressed in black pants, a grey sweater over a white shirt, and black shoes. The hallway is painted yellow with bulletin boards and windows on one side and lockers on the other. The floor features a pattern of blue and yellow tiles, with distinctive blue and yellow lines running down the center, guiding through the corridor.

 

 

Congratulations to our 2024 S.P.A.R.K. award winner, Gissel Burgos. Check out Part 1 of this blog post series and read on to find out more about how she makes content accessible for her multilingual learners.

 

 

 

 


Pre-Teaching Vocabulary

MLLs/ELLs benefit greatly from pre-taught vocabulary since it helps them identify words, understand their meanings, and retain information. It helps students familiarize themselves with the lesson and prepare them for the content instruction. This can be done by choosing vocabulary from a text students will be reading and spending at least 10 minutes of direct instruction of those words. The goal is for students to use the words in a meaningful way.

Here’s how it can be done:

  1. Say the word (or phrase) and have students repeat three times.
  2. State the word (or phrase) in context, straight from the text they are reading.
  3. Provide them with a dictionary definition.
  4. Provide them with a student-friendly definition.
  5. Highlight the grammar, spelling, and/or polysemy.
  6. Provide students with a sentence starter using the vocabulary in a sentence.
  7. Inform students when and how to use the vocabulary in writing assignments.

Table providing students with definitions that are more accessible to them along with grammatical context.

Entering ELLs would not benefit too much from the dictionary definition and the grammar components of the vocabulary just yet. These steps can be skipped for these lower English proficiency students.

Modifying Texts

In a perfect classroom, all students would be reading at grade level. Unfortunately, this is not the reality for many of our students. ELLs, no matter their proficiency level, lack academic vocabulary and knowledge of complex sentence structures that aid comprehension. This makes reading grade level texts independently even more challenging. In order to alleviate this and make the content accessible to all students, texts can be modified in various ways. Below are some text modifications that I use most frequently.

  • Rewrite to simplify – Rewrite the text in your own words, changing the language that you feel is incomprehensible. Keep everything but simplify the language. Chatgpt has made this even easier!
  • Gloss – Leave text intact. Star all unfamiliar or difficult words or word phrases.  On a separate sheet, create an alphabetical list of the expressions with a simple definition.
  • Add pictures – Leave text intact. Break up the text so that there is room for pictures.  Select a few images that will help convey meaning at key moments in the text.
  • Graphic organizer – Leave text intact. Add a graphic organizer that either places the text within it, or is an add-on that helps present the key points from the text. This might be a timeline, a t-chart, etc.
  • Chunk and title – Leave text intact. Break it into meaningful smaller sections with subtitles to help convey meaning.
  • Highlight – Leave text intact. Use a highlighter or bolden to underscore key parts of the text that are essential for comprehension.
  • Provide translation – In the case where English language development is not a primary goal for the text, provide a translated version of the text. This can also help for students to check comprehension of the English version.

Ice Age and Human Migration Collage: Top Left: A paragraph titled "Beringia" discussing the possibility of human migration from Asia to America during the Ice Age when sea levels were lower. Top Right: Two photographs depicting a vast ice-covered landscape and a glacier meeting the sea. Bottom: A map showing the Bering Land Bridge between Asia and North America with areas marked for ice sheets. Labels include "Glacier," "Ice Age," and "Ice Sheet," with definitions provided for each term.

Ice Age and Human Migration Collage: Top Left: A paragraph titled "Beringia" discussing the possibility of human migration from Asia to America during the Ice Age when sea levels were lower. Top Right: Two photographs depicting a vast ice-covered landscape and a glacier meeting the sea. Bottom: A map showing the Bering Land Bridge between Asia and North America with areas marked for ice sheets. Labels include "Glacier," "Ice Age," and "Ice Sheet," with definitions provided for each term.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The challenges of teaching remotely during a pandemic in a monolingual classroom with an Entering ELL helped me become a better teacher for all my students. The connection I was able to build with this student further motivated me to want to support him in any way I could. Although it took many trials and errors and many hours of modifying lesson plans, the progress I was able to see in this student from September to June made it all worth it. Making adjustments to your lesson plans doesn’t have to be tedious and exhausting. They can be as simple as providing a sentence frame when posing a question or adding visuals to a text. A teacher doesn’t even have to speak the same language as the student. All they need is a little empathy.


About Gissel:

Gissel Burgos is the 2024 recipient of the Collaborative’s S.P.A.R.K. award, given annually to one MLL/ELL educator and one special educator who embody special populations advocacy, relationship building, and knowledge sharing. Gissel was born and raised in the Bronx, New York to immigrant parents from Colombia and the Dominican Republic. She has degrees in Childhood Education and T.E.S.O.L. She has been teaching and supporting ELL students for five years. Currently, she is an English as a New Language (ENL) teacher and teacher leader at Family Life Academy Charter School (M.S.) in the Bronx.

Strategies that Work!: Supporting MLLs/ELLs (Part 1)

By Gissel Burgos

Teaching remotely during the pandemic sucked. It was only my second year of teaching and I found myself overwhelmed with converting my in-person lessons to remote, synchronous lessons and dealing with a peculiar new set of classroom management issues like students refusing to turn on their cameras. For 10 months, it felt like I was staring at black screens and talking to myself on a Zoom call. Aside from these challenges, it was also my first year working with an Entering English Language Learner (ELL) from the Dominican Republic that knew absolutely no English. Although I did have the advantage of being fluent in Spanish and could easily communicate with this student, the real challenge was making the content accessible to this student without speaking only in Spanish. Luckily, during this time I was enrolled in the Teaching English to Students of Other Languages (TESOL) program at Hunter College and could apply the English as a New Language (ENL) strategies I was learning right away with my students. I was still overwhelmed, and it took many trials and errors, but ultimately, I was able to implement effective strategies for supporting my students who were just beginning to develop their English proficiency. If you find yourself in a similar situation where you aren’t sure where to start in supporting your newcomer students, I hope you can learn from my experience! Below I share with you strategies that have worked for me and my students.

Sentence Frames

A colorful classroom activity sheet titled “Do Now”. It features a decorative border with peaches and a notebook. The sheet includes personal reflection questions about the student’s name, such as “What does your name mean, and how did your parents choose it? Do you like your name?” There are prompts for students to fill in their responses.

One of my professors in the TESOL program always pointed out when my lesson plans didn’t include sentence frames. She stressed that I should provide students with a sentence frame each time I posed a question, and she was right! Once I became more consistent with including sentence frames, I noticed that my students were answering questions in complete sentences during discussions, were using academic vocabulary, AND their overall writing improved. Sentence frames provide Entering MLLs/ELLs with a starting point. The earlier in the school year that you get students to use the sentence frames, the more accustomed they become to restating the question and providing answers in complete sentences. Eventually, you can gradually begin to pull back from using sentence frames for every question posed.

Translanguaging

Translanguaging is an approach to incorporating the home languages of students in our English classrooms. Allowing students to translanguage is to allow them to use their entire language repertoire to access information and communicate with others. Students have better access to the English language when they are able to compare it to their home language, especially when their home language and English have similar grammar structures and cognates that they can reference, such as English and Spanish.

This can be done by:

  • Strategically grouping students that speak the same home language together so they can discuss questions/tasks in their home languages. (i.e., pair an Entering student with an Expanding student).
  • Allowing students to complete parts of the task in their home language (i.e., group work can be completed in their home language, but the exit ticket must be in English using sentence frames, or vice versa).
  • Having students identify cognates in the text they are reading where possible (i.e., evaluate = evaluar in Spanish; objective = objetivo in Spanish).
  • Providing students with multilingual resources such as translation tools and bilingual glossaries.

Don’t give up if these strategies don’t work right away! Figuring out the best way to implement these strategies can take time but the payoff is worth it. Try them out and I’ll see you next week for Part 2 of Strategies that Work.


About Gissel:

A picture of Gissel standing in a school hallway, facing toward the camera, with one arm extended upwards. She is dressed in black pants, a grey sweater over a white shirt, and black shoes. The hallway is painted yellow with bulletin boards and windows on one side and lockers on the other. The floor features a pattern of blue and yellow tiles, with distinctive blue and yellow lines running down the center, guiding through the corridor.

Gissel Burgos is the 2024 recipient of the Collaborative’s S.P.A.R.K. award, given annually to one MLL/ELL educator and one special educator who embody special populations advocacy, relationship building, and knowledge sharing. Gissel was born and raised in the Bronx, New York to immigrant parents from Colombia and the Dominican Republic. She has degrees in Childhood Education and T.E.S.O.L. She has been teaching and supporting ELL students for five years. Currently, she is an English as a New Language (ENL) teacher and teacher leader at Family Life Academy Charter School (M.S.) in the Bronx.

Getting Creative and Going Concrete with My Math Instruction

By Matthew Macca

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week! While we work to showcase the work of current practitioners all school year, this week offers us a special opportunity to feature teachers who are working to provide inclusive education for their students. A special thank you to our guest blogger Matthew Macca, a 6th-8th Grade Math Learning Specialist at Explore Upper Charter School, for highlighting some ways in which he makes his math instruction more accessible.

Teachers invest in responsive practices and data-driven lessons in order to build classrooms that meet their students’ needs, encourage growth, and foster respect for their opinions. However, there’s one pervasive student opinion that teachers cannot escape: Kids Hate Math. Many find it confusing, boring, confusing, tedious, confusing…and repetitive. For some, it’s easier to relinquish the idea of understanding math and aim instead to just “get it right.” How can we combat this overwhelming hatred and stress towards such an important subject?

As adults, we often forget that the most symbolic (and complex) version of a number is its written form. For example, seeing the symbol “3” is the most abstract version of the number “three.” Seeing three fingers, three dots on dice, or three pencils on a case all represent the number “three” more clearly than the symbol “3.” Once students memorize the symbols for each number in elementary school, we stop using concrete objects to represent symbolic ideas. If we begin to physically enact problems and creatively represent numbers, our middle school students may start, dare I say, LIKING math. Or at the very least, they won’t fear math anymore!

Below are three examples of creative and physicalized math I’ve used this year for 6th, 7th, and 8th graders. I cannot take credit for all of these ideas as many were created by others or built with a co-teacher. However, in enacting these lessons, I’ve seen student joy and understanding increase exponentially and hope my sharing will help create similar experiences for your students.

Students engaging with a large, interactive coordinate plane on the hallway floor, with one student crouching to touch the grid and another observing with papers in hand.

6th Grade – Giant Coordinate Plane

Creating a giant coordinate plane is by far the most involved and time-consuming idea n this list–as well as the most rewarding and beneficial. On a giant coordinate plane, 6th graders could walk to count the spaces between given points and physically see the absolute distance between points in different quadrants. My 8th graders also enjoyed using it to perform rigid transformations. Though this takes time to assemble and take apart, it only requires painters tape (about 4 rolls) and notecards to make! Additionally, students were amazed at the sheer size.

A white surface with groups of colored scribbles and corresponding handwritten counts in black ink: four orange and two purple stripes, and one blue stripe, with the counts ‘Orange = 4 or 2’, ‘Purple = 3’, and ‘Blue = 1’.

7th Grade – Enacting Probability

Probability incorporates two of the most hated aspects of math: word problems and fractions. However, probability word problems easily lend themselves to in class reenactments. If a problem asks for the chances of pulling a red jellybean out of a bag with 3 red and 4 green jelly beans, teachers can make this bag and act out the problem. In order to keep problems clear, it’s best to use large objects (replace jelly beans with colored notecards or larger stress balls) and use a clear bag so students can see every object. Sometimes, ditching the bag and placing all the objects on the whiteboard works best. Making multiple class sets allows students to practice on their own and check if their answers are reasonable.

A hand-drawn diagram on paper with two parallel lines AB and CD intersected by a transversal line, forming alternate interior angles. The angles on one side of the transversal are colored orange and labeled as 50°, and the angles on the opposite side are colored purple and labeled as 130°. The text ‘Orange=50°’ and ‘Purple=130°’ is written at the top left corner.

8th Grade – Coloring Angle Relationships

With colored pencils and crayons, students can visualize which angles in a figure made of two parallel lines cut by a transversal are equivalent. The colors help students visualize and remember these relationships better than simply labeling with degree sizes. Additionally, many 8th graders enjoy coloring and will love showing their thinking through colored pencils instead of numbers.

No matter the grade, it’s important to keep school accessible and fun. If we take time to make math less symbolic and more concrete, students will find a deeper understanding and find joy in their education.

About Matthew:

Matthew Macca is a 6th-8th Grade Math Learning Specialist at Explore Upper Charter School in Brooklyn. He’s previously taught Reading and Social Studies to 3rd-5th Grade students and is currently pursuing a degree in 1st-6th grade Special Education.

New Podcast Episode: From Advocacy to Action with Jennifer Pierre

In this episode of EdVentures, Melissa Katz engages in a dynamic conversation with Jennifer Pierre, the Student Support Services Manager at Brooklyn Prospect High School. Jennifer shares invaluable insights on navigating the intricacies of advocating for student needs. From fostering authentic connections to driving tangible change, Jennifer offers practical strategies for empowering educators and students alike. Join Melissa and Jennifer as they explore the transformative power of advocacy in education, inspiring listeners to take action and make a difference. Listen now and download the transcript.

Don’t forget to follow us on Spotify so you never miss an episode!

Celebrating Neurodiversity: It’s Autism Acceptance Month!

By Kimberly “Kiki” Almonte

It’s April, and that means it’s Autism Acceptance Month! This is a time to celebrate the incredible diversity of the autistic community and raise awareness about the realities of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

As a team member of the Collaborative for Inclusive Education, autism awareness and acceptance holds professional significance to me, but I also have a special, personal connection to this topic, as well. Despite the signs being quite evident in hindsight, when I was a student, I wasn’t diagnosed with autism due to being a quiet, well-behaved female who excelled academically. This, coupled with the presence of ADHD, further complicated the picture, and the years of misunderstanding and confusion significantly impacted my life. I believe in the philosophy of becoming the adult you needed as a child. That’s why I’m passionate about advocating for autistic students who might go undiagnosed or misunderstood. I want them to receive the support they deserve, just like every other child in the classroom. After all, isn’t that why most of us enter the field of education? We have a love for learning, care deeply about our students, and want them to flourish not just academically but throughout their lives.

While you might think autism is relatively rare, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports, as of 2023, that 1 in 36 children in the US are diagnosed with ASD. A different 2023 study in the New York-New Jersey metropolitan area found that 1 in 4 16-year-old students met the criteria for undiagnosed autism. However, it’s important to note that this number likely underestimates the true prevalence.

Here’s why:

So, what does this mean for educators?

Since research suggests the prevalence of autism is higher than you might think, even if you don’t currently have a student with a formal autism diagnosis, there’s a good chance you have autistic students in your class.

Empower Yourself and Your Students:

Remember that ASD is a wide spectrum. Autistic folks are individuals, not a monolith. Think of the autism spectrum not as a straight line, but as a vast circle with countless variations. By becoming more knowledgeable about autism spectrum disorder, not only can you better support both diagnosed and undiagnosed autistic students in your classroom, but, exactly because that spectrum is so varied, you will also gain valuable tools to understand and support a wider range of learners and create a more inclusive environment that benefits all students.

Understanding is Key. Autism is a part of the rich tapestry of human diversity. Just as you would strive to learn about different cultures, take this opportunity to educate yourself about autism and understand how it can shape an individual’s experience. This knowledge will empower you to better support all your students.

We’ll help you kick off this learning journey. Check out our comprehensive Resource Corner Guide for Autism Spectrum Disorder and explore the variety of resources we’ve compiled regarding ASD, from information to help you better understand what it is to resources you can use in the classroom with your students.

By becoming more informed, we can create a more inclusive and supportive environment for everyone. And by recognizing and celebrating neurodiversity, we create richer learning environments for all students.

New Podcast Episode: Cultivating Connections in Education with Dawn Campbell

Join Melissa Katz in another enlightening episode of EdVentures as she engages in a heartfelt conversation with Dawn Campbell, recipient of the Jeannine King S.P.A.R.K. Award. Dawn shares her profound insights on advocacy, relationship building, and knowledge sharing in education, drawing from her experiences as a dedicated teacher and parent of children with special needs. Discover the power of authentic connections and their transformative impact on students and families. Listen now and download the transcript.

Don’t forget to follow us on Spotify so you never miss an episode!

New Podcast Episode: AI: A Helpful Assistant for MLL/ELL Teahers

In this episode of EdVenture, hear from MLL/ELL veteran educator Frederic Lim as he shares ways teachers can leverage AI to work smarter and not harder in service of their multilingual students. Don’t forget to sign up for Frederic’s upcoming workshops on October 5 and October 19 on leveraging Chat GPT in your planning! Listen now and download the transcript.

Don’t forget to follow us on Spotify so you never miss an episode!

Introducing Season Two of Our Podcast, EdVenture!

New school year, new season of our podcast! In this season of EdVenture, our Collaborative leader and podcast host Melissa Katz will be chatting with experts about the post-COVID special populations landscape and implications for the classroom.

Episode 1 – Navigating New Horizons with Ellie Grose
Meet the Collaborative’s newest Inclusive Education Specialist, Ellie Grose! In this episode, you’ll learn about Ellie’s 20-year journey from special educator to administrator and her insights into post-pandemic education trends. Listen now and download the transcript.

Episode 2 – Championing Inclusive Education with Stacy Marshall
In this discussion with Stacy Marshall, INCLUDEnyc’s director of Parent and Family Engagement, we explore the pivotal role of collaborative efforts between schools and families in shaping IEPs and driving inclusive education forward. Stacy also shares key learnings about the role empathy plays in these essential partnerships. Listen now and download the transcript.

Don’t forget to follow us on Spotify so you never miss an episode of the podcast!

Beyond the Buzzwords: Demystifying Content and Language Objectives

The Jeannine King S.P.A.R.K. (Special Populations Advocate, Relationship-builder, and Knowledge-Sharer) Award was established in honor of our beloved colleague, Jeannine King, who passed away in April. Jeannine served as an Inclusive Education Specialist at the Collaborative and, prior to that, as a member of the Bronx Community Charter School community for 13 years, holding various positions in special education and leadership. Below we feature a blog post from one of our inaugural S.P.A.R.K. Award winners, Avery Hollander, Dean of Multilingual Learning at East Harlem Scholars, which features some ways in which she seeks to provide access and supports to special populations students.

 

Beyond the Buzzwords: Demystifying Content and Language Objectives

By Avery Hollander

What’s the point?

Objectives are the heart of planning a meaningful lesson; they define what students will be able to do when the lesson is completed. Without an objective, a lesson would not have a clear purpose or goal, for both the teacher and the students!

Did you know that every lesson has at least two objectives? A content objective and a language objective. Before we get into why both of these objectives are important, let’s discuss what each objective is and how they differ.

Learning the Objectives

A content objective is what we primarily consider when planning a lesson. It can be defined as the goal for what students will do or know upon completion of the lesson. In other words, the content objective is the what.

A language objective can be defined as the goal for how students will use language to reach the content objective. In other words, the language objective is the how.

(Vibas, 2017)

Digging Deeper: Examples

Let’s imagine that you’re teaching a lesson on weather to kindergarten students, with the goal of helping them identify different types of precipitation. The content objective is clear: students should be able to recognize and name different forms of precipitation.

To support this objective, you can define a language objective that describes how students will use language to achieve the content objective. For example, the language objective could be: students will be able to describe visual representations of precipitation using tier 3 vocabulary. This means that in addition to simply recognizing different types of precipitation, students should be able to verbally describe what they see using more complex and specific language. By focusing on both content and language objectives, you can help students develop a deeper understanding of the topic while also improving their language skills.

Example 1: A Kindergarten Classroom Studying Weather

Content Objective Students will be able to identify the types of precipitation
Language Objective Students will be able to orally describe visual representations of precipitation using tier 3 vocabulary.

Let’s review another example. You are teaching a unit to high school students about the different revolutions. The end of the unit culminates with a final project where students compare and contrast two revolutions studied in the unit. The content objective for this final lesson may be: students will be able to identify the similarities and differences between two revolutions. Now, let’s consider a possible language objective. How will students use language to demonstrate they have reached this content objective? One possibility may be: students will use comparative and contrastive language to describe in writing how two revolutions are similar and different.

Example 2: A High School Classroom Studying Revolutions

Content Objective Students will be able to identify the similarities and differences between two revolutions.
Language Objective Students will use comparative and contrastive language to describe in writing how two revolutions are similar and different.

Why Include Language Objectives?

Now that we have a clearer idea of what language objectives are, you may be wondering why are these objectives important to consider in lesson planning? How do they help students? Identifying the language objective(s) in a lesson means that you as the teacher have a clear idea of what language is necessary for students to meet the content objective.

When working with special population students, particularly those who are multilingual learners, it’s crucial to identify the language objective(s) for the lesson. Then, you can plan intentional scaffolding to support these students in meeting the objectives by breaking down the content and language, providing extra practice opportunities, and using appropriate instructional strategies to support student success.

Let’s go back to the high school example. The goal is for all students to reach both the language and content objectives- what can be differentiated is how they reach those objectives. Some students may need no scaffolding; they can independently write an academic essay describing the similarities and differences between two revolutions. However, an emerging level multilingual learner will need additional support in order to reach this objective. For example, perhaps they complete a cloze paragraph to use comparative and contrastive language to describe in writing how two revolutions are similar and different. Maybe, they engage in partner writing with a transitioning level multilingual learner and the pair uses a word bank and exemplary essay to write their own paper. Regardless of the type of scaffold that would support that student, the student is still going to meet the class objectives of the lesson.

Closing

In summary, both content objectives and language objectives are a critical component of lesson planning. Objectives drive the intention and expectations of the lesson for both the students and the teacher. Including language objectives in our lesson planning is important because it enables us to intentionally design scaffolding that supports all students in successfully accessing the content, and meeting the lesson’s objectives!

Sources:

Vibas (2017). [objectives on classroom whiteboard] [photo]. A Walk in the Chalk. http://www.awalkinthechalk.com/2015/02/i-can-statements.html

Resources:

https://ellevationeducation.com/blog/crafting-language-objectives-support-english-language-lear ners-ells

https://www.colorincolorado.org/article/language-objectives-key-effective-content-area-instructi on-english-learners

Remembering Jeannine King

By Melissa Katz, Vice President of Inclusive Education
Jeannine King

Jeannine King

It is with heartbreaking sadness that I share the news of Jeannine King’s passing. Many of you reading this met Jeannine through her work with the Collaborative, but may have already been familiar with her through her special education and leadership roles at Bronx Community Charter School, where she worked for 13 years prior to joining the Collaborative this school year.

I first met Jeannine almost nine years ago when I joined the Charter Center as the founding MLL/ELL Specialist. It was clear to me from our earliest interactions that she was a high-capacity educator who was deeply committed to ensuring students received all the supports they needed and deserved. Over the years, I interacted with her at many Collaborative workshops and conferences, where she not only engaged thoughtfully in her own learning, but also generously shared her own knowledge and experiences with her peers to further their professional development.

When Jeannine joined the Collaborative as an Inclusive Education Specialist this year, the entire team was so excited to be working with her. As part of an onboarding teambuilder, she shared that she really valued teammates who were empathetic, which was a trait that she certainly embodied. I appreciated how she focused on the human element in our work. There can be generalizations when we’re talking about school improvement and scaling initiatives, but Jeannine was always sure to prompt thinking around student perspectives and genuine relationship-building.

Beyond respecting her professionally, I really admired Jeannine as a person. She was a straight shooter and never shied away from naming hard truths (in the final meeting we all had together, she led a reflection on racist practices embedded in crisis intervention trainings), but she also made sure to celebrate accomplishments and made having fun a priority too. As much as she poured herself into her work, Jeannine also took time for herself with her family, whom she clearly loved so much. When discussing weekend plans, she always had something exciting planned with her husband Chris, and her son Naima when he was home from college. The theme for her birthday celebration last month was sparkling (a theme she assured me she strictly enforced), which was fitting since Jeannine herself sparkled with life. She will be so missed.

When Jeannine joined the team, she shared that she hoped to be able to describe her time with us as impactful. As the news reached schools about her sudden passing, many reached out with kind words and stories of just how impactful her work with them was, particularly in strengthening instructional and behavioral supports for students with disabilities. May her memory call us all to continue the work and serve the values to which Jeannine dedicated herself with authenticity, generosity, and constancy.

I’ll end with a quote that Jeannine liked to share at the beginning of her trainings from Dr. Chris Emdin, an educator and advocate she greatly admired: “True teaching is only effective when it triggers something that lasts forever or sparks a desire in the student to discover more beyond the classroom.”

Jeannine’s service will be held on Wednesday, April 12 at 11am at Miles Funeral Home (136 Decatur St., Brooklyn, NY 11216).

Bronx Community Charter School knew Jeannine very well after 13 years, as well as her son Naima, who was a student there; they created a GoFundMe to support him. There is also a separate fund for immediate expenses, including the funeral and reception, that will go to Jeannine’s husband, Chris.